Earth 2.0 – Plan B for Mankind

Looks like there might just be a Plan B for when we eventually gas ourselves out of our own planet or those apocalyptic zombie films finally make good on their promise to obliterate mankind. Astronomers have discovered a planet that – upon preliminary investigation – would appear to be so similar to our own that there’s a very real possibility it could be fit for human habitation. This comes as great news, because by the time we are forced to move planets (and the technology for interstellar travel has been invented), local asteroid-defeating hero, Bruce Willis, will be long dead. Hooray for Plan B!

Video Source: “Could we move to Earth 2.0?” uploaded by Science Channel to YouTube channel https://youtu.be/fdksRkeBcNU

“The First Man In Space” – a NASA Parody

This video was submitted to me a few days ago by one of Why? Because Science‘s enthusiasts, Lena Brooks. It’s a funny short by her sketch comedy group called Naptime Comedy and I thought it was so amusing (and well done) that it deserves a share…

Video Source: “The First Man In Space” by Naptime Comedy on YouTube channel www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2WJdjJfcNM&feature=youtu.be

Unexplained “Space Music” Recorded by Apollo Astronauts

When one talks about music on the dark side of the moon, Pink Floyd no doubt springs to mind. But, what this video reveals is that, while making its transit of the far side of the moon, the Apollo space shuttle captured recordings of a strange music of unknown origin. It is believed this “music” – which consists of an eerie cyclical whooshing and whistling sound – came from outer space, because there is NO radio reception from Earth behind the moon.

Could this “music” have come from some higher intelligence? And why were the recordings hidden from public knowledge for so long? No one can say for sure, but the mere fact that NASA doesn’t seem to offer up any explanations is certainly a mystery in itself…

Video Source: “Outer Space Music Pt 1 of 2” uploaded by Science Channel to YouTube channel www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjLZBrQ-Oq4#action=share

Gravity Waves Discovered: In Plain English

Social media has been abuzz with a breaking discovery in science and exploration, which tells us two things: (1) Our society has come a long way as far as interest in the sciences is concerned – people are actually getting excited over this latest discovery and are sharing the news via Facebook, Twitter etc. And (2) the news itself is absolutely revolutionary! Einstein’s theory has effectively been proven with the first real detection of gravity waves. But, I’ll let theoretical physicist and string theorist Brian Greene explain that to you…

Video Source:Brian Greene Explains The Discovery Of Gravity Waves” Uploaded by World Science Festival to YouTube channel www.youtube.com/watch?v=s06_jRK939I

Pluto is Avenged: Evidence of Ninth Planet Found!

Just when you got over the news that Pluto is no longer considered a planet, comes the compelling evidence that our solar system may indeed have a ninth planet that is considerably larger than Earth! The reason we haven’t picked up on its presence yet is because it lies a staggering distance from the sun and has an orbital period (time it takes to bumble its way around the sun) of 20,000 years! Check out the very interesting findings and discussions of the team at Caltech…

Video Source: “Evidence of a Ninth Planet” uploaded by caltech to YouTube channel www.youtube.com/watch?v=6poHQ2h00ZA

Cool Things Col. Hadfield Taught Us About Space Livin’

Colonel Chris Hadfield is pretty much the modern face of space exploration. In this video and others that have been uploaded to YouTube, he demonstrates the awesomeness of zero gravity and the various peculiars of space living, answering age-old questions asked by children everywhere: How do you sleep in space? How do you wash your hands? What food do you eat?

Video Source: “Cool Things Col. Chris Hadfield Taught Us About Space” Uploaded by Mixtape Master on YouTube channel www.youtube.com/watch?v=uy50lRbOpW8

If The Planets Took The Place of Our Moon…

Ever wonder what the view of Mars would be if it were as close to us as our moon? Would it glow a belligerent red in our night sky and confuse moths the world over? How about Neptune: would it cast a seductive blue glow over the body of your lover as she lies recovering from a delicious round of rodgering? Now imagine Jupiter, our solar system’s largest planet with moons that are twice/thrice the size of ours… what would they all look like if they had to take the place of our moon, without cataclysmically affecting life on our planet? This video answers that question…

Video Source: Uploaded by yeti dynamics to YouTube channel www.youtube.com/watch?v=usYC_Z36rHw

 

 

Scientific Songs of Praise: Ho Ho Ho!

It doesn’t matter whether you’re Christian or not; if you have a sense of humour, you’ll LOVE these. Scientific Songs of Praise applies sciencey lyrics and spectacular space imagery to those boring old stuffy Christmas carols we all know, turning them into something magnificent. I’ll be sharing a few of their videos leading up to Christmas, just to get you into the yuletide spirit!

Solar Light (Silent Night) Gospel – Scientific Songs of Praise #6

Video Source: By Scientific Songs of Praise, YouTube channel https://youtu.be/3OnyiR2CKBU?list=PLqAaxjrofZ64FCCyUJVce-75uFQpXXYXP

Want more, daddy? You can check out their Facebook page here: www.facebook.com/scientificsongs

Run For Cover! Awesome Meteorite Footage

Few things fascinate us quite like our worst nightmares and while we may not actively think about devastating meteorite impacts punching an inconvenient hole into our day, such an event would certainly serve to put things into perspective for us! For example, cold coffee, traffic jams and your imbecile boss are not the end of the world. A meteorite impact could be.

Let’s take a look at some spectacular footage of space objects having fender benders with our planet.

Meteorite Soars into Tyumen, Chelyabinsk and Yekaterinburg, Russia, Feb 13th 2013: A Compilation of the Internet’s Best Clips

Meteor Footage Video Source: Uploaded by LifeBeyondEarth on YouTubeChannel https://youtu.be/UqrA007yZWQ

Want to hear a joke? The Russian meteorite in this video was considered “small.” Gosh, NASA scientists and their size issues! First Pluto and now this?

Eight months after this meteorite collided into the Earth, it was finally extracted from its resting place in Lake Chebarkul. It weighed a staggering 570 kg, which explains the damage it did to more than 3,000 nearby buildings and 1,000 people. The blast of this meteorite was estimated to carry the equivalent punch of 300,000 tonnes of dynamite.

Beautiful Time Lapse Video of Geminid Meteor Shower, December 30th, 2012

Meteor Footage Video Source: Uploaded by Kenneth Brandon (Dark Sky Chaser) on YouTube Channel https://youtu.be/S_jdfyp8pL0

Every December, the heavens rain down Christmas upon avid sky-watchers and star enthusiasts in the form of the beautiful, glittering Geminid Meteor shower. In this video, photographer Kenneth Brandon filmed the entire event and then sped it up so that we can truly appreciate why this event is actually called a “meteor shower” in the first place. In the first sequence, we see the star trails in addition to the meteors, which in reality are probably no bigger than grains of sand. In the second sequence, the meteor trails have been rendered persistent by some nimble filming techniques. Gorgeous!

The End of the World Asteroid Impact: Animated Conjecture By JDC Creation

Meteor Footage Video Source: Uploaded by JDC Creation on YouTubeChannel https://youtu.be/pe3s2G8ulBc

Now THIS is something to start your day with! What happened if a gigantic asteroid smacked into Earth and Bruce Willis wasn’t available to stop it? This video. This animated short video provides us with front row seats to the end of the world.

Life on Mars: Relocation, Relocation, Relocation!

Planet Mars with Rising Sun

Every single morning, when my alarm drops a hydrogen bomb into the middle of my sexy dreams, I lie in bed entertaining fantasies of further sleep. What would I do to be able to sink back into the cotton wool comfiness of my sub-consciousness for another half hour? In my irrational sleep-addled state, a lot! So, sign me up for the first commercial flight to Mars because with days that are not 30 minutes, but 40 minutes longer than on Earth, my desperate desire for extra sleep would be granted!

Curiosity Weighs 899 kg

Luckily There Aren’t Any Cats on Mars

On the 5th August of 2012, the Mars rover ‘Curiosity’ made a successful landing on the powdery, rock-strewn surface of the Red Planet. A part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, Curiosity’s primary objective is to explore the real estate on Mars and the possibility of humans inhabiting it at some time in the not-so-distant future.

Curiosity Mars Rover self-portraitA self-portrait of the Mars rover, Curiosity. #Selfie.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems. Derivative work including grading, distortion correction, minor local adjustments and rendering from tiff-file: Julian Herzog – http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16239

This sophisticated piece of machinery (see above image) cost NASA $2.5 billion to build and is designed to investigate features of Mars’ geology and climate during the course of its two-year long investigation. More specifically, the aptly-named ‘Curiosity’ will be looking for “ancient organic compounds,” according to NASA Ames Research Centre’s planetary scientist, Carol Stoker. This would help us understand the history of Mars, Earth’s sister planet,’ as a previous or even current supporter of life

All of the high tech gadgetry aboard the ‘Curiosity’ is essentially geared to measure the presence, nature and concentration of organic compounds that are possibly locked within the planet’s dry soils. After two years of exploration, ‘Curiosity’ will hopefully have answered our many pressing questions about the habitability of Mars. This could bring us closer, much closer, to planning an alternate future on the Red Planet… just in case we gas ourselves out of our own home in the solar system.

Or, you know, Bruce Willis chickens out of his mission to blow up an Earth-bound asteroid.

Meet The Red Planet! 

Planet Mars

Hey, hi, how are ya?

Astute academics such as Dr. Richard Zurek, Chief Scientist in the Mars Program Office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have strong reason to suspect that Mars was once home to living organisms and that the Curiosity mission will indeed yield fruit. The presence of frozen water at the poles, an atmosphere that consists almost entirely of carbon dioxide, geological features that appear to have been carved and shaped by running water and a climate that is not wholly intolerable, indicate that out of all other known planets and moons in our solar system, Mars is or at least was the most accommodating of life.

What we want to know is whether we too could one day inhabit this arid red landscape… and if so, what would life on Mars be like?

Planet Profile: Mars

Mars planet

Etymology: Thanks to its blood-red colour, Mars was named by ancient civilizations after the Roman God of War.

Diameter: 6,787 kilometres

Average distance from Sun: 227,936,640 kilometres.

Rotation period (length of day): 1.026 Earth days

Orbital period (length of year): 686.98 Earth days

Menstrual period: huh?

Tilt of axis: 25° (Earth’s is approximately 23.4°)

Maximum surface temperature (tanning weather): 37°C

Minimum surface temperature (cuddle weather): -123°C

Best view from Mars: Olympus Mons, which is 27 kilometres higher than surrounding lava plains.

Atmospheric constituents: (1) 95% carbon dioxide, (2) 3% nitrogen, (3) 1.6% argon and (4) other trace gases. Methane was recently discovered there, too.

Your Martian Calendar and Climate

Because of Mars’ distance from the sun, 227,936,640 km on average, it takes quite a bit longer for it to bumble its way around the fiery focal point of our solar system. This means that a Martian year is much longer than an Earth year; approximately twice as long, in fact. There are 687 days in a year on Mars. Thanks to the planet’s tilted axis, however, there are still two primary seasons: summer and winter. This doesn’t really matter though. With average year-round temperatures of -60°C (-80°F) you’re still going to need to take a very warm jacket and maybe a pair of mittens, too. There are a few balmy days to look forward to… in summer, the mercury in Mars’ equatorial regions can actually hit 20°C (70°F), punctuated by days of a roasty toasty 37°C (98°F).

In spite of the cold, Mars is a desert planet, much like Tatooine, the one Star Wars’ Anakin Skywalker comes from… wait, hold on… did I just say that out loud? It never rains on Mars’ rust-red landscape and the only break you get in the distant and diluted sunshine is high level, coruscating congregations of ice-crystals; similar in fact to the cirrus clouds we get here on Earth. Bitterly cold winters aside, Mars would seem to be a rather affable place to settle.

Wouldn’t it?

Not always! When the horizon darkens and the wind picks up, it’s time to hit to road, Jack. Mars’ raging dust storms are the most tempestuous in the entire solar system.

Mars 2001 sandstorm NASA

In 2001, the Hubble Space Telescope captured the complete transformation of Mars as an enormous dust storm swept over the entire globe’s surface. These storms are driven by winds of up to 160 km/hr and can last weeks or even months. On the up-side, with nothing else to do other than stay inside, this would hurry along the population of Mars…

Martian Tourist Attractions

Once you get bored of admiring endless vistas of red nothingness and of tripping over the legions of sharp rocks that are ubiquitous to Mar’s dusty, empty landscape, you will need to take in a few of the planet’s more redeeming features. Thankfully, there are plenty of those. Mars offers some spectacular natural attractions that make the Grand Canyon look like a butt crack and Earth’s biggest volcano, Mauna Loa, look like a bug bite. Albeit a bad one.

Olympus Mons is Mars’ largest mountain/volcano/OMG-look-at-THAT!! At a lofty 27 kilometres (17 miles) high and an expansive 600 kilometres (372 miles) across, this megalith is three times as tall as Mount Everest, Earth’s largest mountain. It’s also the largest known volcano in the solar system.

Olympus Mons on Mars

What was once a suppurating abscess of death is now a brooding blackhead on the face of Mars’ blood-red landscape. Olympus Mons sits conspicuously in the top-right hand quadrant of this colorised topographical map of The Red Planet, from the MOLA instrument of Mars Global Surveyor.